Tag Archives: Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce

Mad Men: The Other Woman

SONIA BRAND-FISHER: When my mother read Gwenyth Swain’s “The Road to Seneca Falls” (a children’s chapter book about the women’s suffrage movement) to me as a little girl, the book began with with a detailed account of the unjust, yet normalized opinions of women and their roles in society. A visceral reaction came from my 7-year-old self in response to the tame description of the marginalization of women. I began to scream and cry, my mind whirled, and my mother put the book on the shelf never to be touched again. A similar reaction came over me when watching this episode of “Mad Men.” Though there was no temper tantrum, and I sat through the entire episode, by the end I was shaking. The structure, the men, the women, the pimps, the whores, the actors, the agencies, and The Other Woman all make up the best hour of television that I have ever seen. Continue reading

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Mad Men: Far Away Places

SONIA BRAND-FISHER: This Sunday’s episode of “Mad Men” lived up to its title and certainly took us to some far away places, like the deep subconscious of Roger Sterling, the most unstable anxieties of Don Draper, the biggest resentments held by Megan Draper, and the ever-changing thought processes of Peggy Olson. We tripped out and got cerebral, dropped some jaws, and actually started to like Megan a little bit more. We watched out heros feebly try to negotiate the territory between time, space, and good intentions. With another destructive relationship crossed out, “Mad Men” travels deeper into the knots and snarls that this season, and seasons past, have left to be slowly untangled.

HOWARD MEGDAL: Exactly! Roger and Joan getting out of their entanglements, back-to-back! Guessing it isn’t that simple, but that’s certainly what I thought of as well. Continue reading

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Mad Men: Tea Leaves

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SONIA BRAND-FISHER: For the first time in the entire series of “Mad Men,” I feel unrestrained and sincere sympathy for Betty Hofstadt Draper Francis. All of our jaws dropped when the svelte Grace Kelly look-a-like we…

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Mad Men: A Little Kiss

SONIA BRAND-FISHER: The “Mad Men” that entered our homes on Sunday night was not the “Mad Men” that we have grown accustomed to for the past four seasons. The moods and energies of the worlds between and beyond the glass doors of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce have shifted in a way that history has told us was inevitable.

HOWARD MEGDAL: How wonderful to spend two hours luxuriating in Mad Men world once again-though the commercial breaks every ten minutes felt excessive (Ironic complaint given the show’s subject, I suppose). That alone was enough for me, but a number of plot points were set into motion, with new conflicts and consequences stemming from established characters promising a tremendous fifth season. Continue reading

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Mad Men: Season Finale in Review

SONIA BRAND-FISHER: What is one supposed to do when Don Draper proposes to a brunette, his secretary, in bed, in a room that is not his one, on a coast that is not his own? Are we supposed to compare him to Roger Sterling proposing to his twenty year old secretary in Season 3, who was supposed to bring vibrancy at a time when the world around him seemed to embody an emotional wasteland? Are we supposed to feel joy and tear up at Megan’s sweet and genuine reaction? Did we see this coming? The Season 4 finale of “Mad Men” seemed overwhelming with conflicting emotions of disgust and relief, surprise and verification, distrust and acceptance.

HOWARD MEGDAL: I’ve heard plenty of discussion about what the choice of Megan over Faye represents, but not this: the choosing of Don Draper as the identity moving forward over Dick Whitman. And further, this doesn’t represent a backslide from the work Don has done on himself- it represents an embrace of it- a third way, really. Continue reading

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