Tag Archives: Kurt Vonnegut

Review: Albert Brooks’ 2030

AKIE BERMISS: Albert Brooks’ new book, 2030, is a more complicated pleasure than one would think. If you think it’s just a bit of dark comedy about the near future, you’re in for a big surprise. It would appear that Mr. Brooks decided to write: a novel. Since I know him primarily as a humorist and actor I thought this would be a light bit of fluff, a quick read, and leave my mind as soon as a closed the book. Instead, the story and its prognostications stay with me. If I didn’t know that Brooks was a humorist, I’d be tempted to say this was actually a “sad” story.

HOWARD MEGDAL: It would be nearly impossible to find a more devoted Albert Brooks fan than me. I think I’ve seen Julie Hagerty lose her nest egg more than 50 times. I want every omelet to be the one served in Defendingg Your Life. And freezer burn, in my house, is “protective ice”. I once went to the Museum of TV and Radio just to see Albert Brooks’ short films made for Saturday Night Live before they were widely available. Continue reading

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Conan to TBS

AKIE BERMISS: For me, Television fell down the day NBC let Conan O’Brien leave and gave the Tonight Show back to Jay Leno. Television is about suspending belief. In these days, when it is no longer the main thoroughfare for entertainment and information, we are really suspending belief. There’s no real compulsion to gather ’round the tv these days. We’ve got blackberries, iphones, laptops, and: cable. Television is coming up on its emeritus days. And very few things are as synonymous with television as the Tonight Show. And to me, when the Tonight Show fell down — television fell down.

ZOË RICE: With Conan O’Brien’s move to TBS, the scales may be officially tipped. As far as relevance goes, network and cable late night programming had reached something of a balance: The Tonight Show and The Late Show dominated the network market, and The Daily Show and The Colbert Report owned the basic cable share. When everyone assumed Conan would go to Fox, a new wrench was expected to disrupt the network two-party system–how fun it would be to watch Conan battle it out with Jay and Dave within the old establishment. But now, with Conan jumping ship to basic cable, the battle he enters is much broader in scope. Instead of O’Brien vs. Leno vs. Letterman, it’s going to be senior citizen network television vs. young twenty-something cable. The very nature of relevant late-night programming may shift away from the struggling networks, extinguishing one of their last holds on wit and edge. In a couple years, network late night might simply be obsolete. Continue reading

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