Tag Archives: Hulu

Community vs. 30 Rock

AKIE BERMISS: I was an early adopter of Community. It debuted when I still had cable and I still watched television live. But it was one of the last shows I did that with. Increasingly, as a man pushing thirty, I’ve found new television shows have very little to offer me. I don’t get excited by reality shows — the pseudo-drama just doesn’t do it for me — and, being a professional singer and vocal teacher, I can’t stand shows like American Idol or The Voice. So I was finding myself marginalized more and more by primetime television. Call me old fashioned but I miss the days of primetime half-hour sitcoms followed by hour-long dramas at 10pm. To me, those were the days. I guess I was young and things seemed simpler then. But also, I rather think if I am going to sit down and waste an hour, I’d rather it be scripted material performed by professionals and shot by experienced techies.

CHRIS PUMMER: I think Akie’s comparison of 30 Rock to the dynastic Bulls of Michael Jordan is apt. Because while Community is brilliant, 30 Rock has been at least that brilliant for much longer now. Continue reading

Posted in Arts & Culture | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Conan to TBS

AKIE BERMISS: For me, Television fell down the day NBC let Conan O’Brien leave and gave the Tonight Show back to Jay Leno. Television is about suspending belief. In these days, when it is no longer the main thoroughfare for entertainment and information, we are really suspending belief. There’s no real compulsion to gather ’round the tv these days. We’ve got blackberries, iphones, laptops, and: cable. Television is coming up on its emeritus days. And very few things are as synonymous with television as the Tonight Show. And to me, when the Tonight Show fell down — television fell down.

ZOË RICE: With Conan O’Brien’s move to TBS, the scales may be officially tipped. As far as relevance goes, network and cable late night programming had reached something of a balance: The Tonight Show and The Late Show dominated the network market, and The Daily Show and The Colbert Report owned the basic cable share. When everyone assumed Conan would go to Fox, a new wrench was expected to disrupt the network two-party system–how fun it would be to watch Conan battle it out with Jay and Dave within the old establishment. But now, with Conan jumping ship to basic cable, the battle he enters is much broader in scope. Instead of O’Brien vs. Leno vs. Letterman, it’s going to be senior citizen network television vs. young twenty-something cable. The very nature of relevant late-night programming may shift away from the struggling networks, extinguishing one of their last holds on wit and edge. In a couple years, network late night might simply be obsolete. Continue reading

Posted in Arts & Culture | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment