Tag Archives: Freud

Silver Linings Playbook

SONIA BRAND-FISHER: How to put this gently… “Silver Linings Playbook” is a film that, for me, had enormous potential. With an A-list cast, a colloquial script, and a hand-held camera used to capture the intimate neuroses of a middle-class family in Philadelphia, there were moments of genuine enthusiasm and struggle. The film followed the family’s process of accepting one of their sons, Pat (Bradley Cooper), home from a psychiatric institution. The beauty of this film lies in the dynamics and layered dialogue of the central family, who prepare for each Eagles games with a series of good-luck rituals to keep up the juju while noshing on “crab snacks and homemades.” You seriously felt like you were in this family’s house, sharing their joy and anguish over everything from Hemingway to heartbreak. Yet, what seriously tarnished what otherwise was a current and down-to-earth film was the distorted and gut-wrenching representation of its women. Continue reading

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Pan Am: Week 4 in Review

SONIA BRAND-FISHER: Though ABC’s “Pan Am” has proven to be so visually superb and ambitious, I have this gut-wrenching sense that it might slowly become more of a sorority drama than a show about the people involved in the glamour of air-travel. Episode Four took place mostly in Burma, where sibling rivalry subplots butt heads with Kate’s increasingly imprecise job as a CIA agent which gets tangled in the power struggle between Ted and Dean. It would be unfair of me to say that I’m getting increasingly bored by the show, because that is absolutely far from true. I guess I’m just tired of Kate and Laura’s bickering. I guess the script didn’t hold up as well during this episode as it did in the past three. I guess I just really want to punch Maggie in the face.

JESSICA BADER: This episode wasn’t as weighty as the previous installment in Berlin, and I think that fits the show just fine. One of the challenges that a period piece faces is that references to actual historical events often come across as heavy-handed, and the Kennedy-speech aspect of the Berlin episode definitely tilted in that direction. (Don’t even get me started on Christina Ricci’s uncomfortably manic portrayal of Maggie’s quest to meet Kennedy.) This time, the historical allusions were less specific, leaving more breathing room for character development. Continue reading

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