Tag Archives: CBS

Two And A Half Men Considered

NAVA BRAHE: There isn’t much on television these days that is worth watching. When a friend of mine couldn’t stop raving about how “hysterically” funny Two and a Half Men is, I decided to give it a whirl. I started watching the episodes in syndication, but it wasn’t long before I was making a point of watching the first-run episodes on CBS. The acting, along with the writing were especially clever, but what kept me coming back for more were Chuck Lorre’s now infamous vanity cards at the end of each episode. I had a DVR at that time, so I was able to pause, read, and laugh out loud at most of them. All in all, the time invested was time well spent.
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Conan to TBS

AKIE BERMISS: For me, Television fell down the day NBC let Conan O’Brien leave and gave the Tonight Show back to Jay Leno. Television is about suspending belief. In these days, when it is no longer the main thoroughfare for entertainment and information, we are really suspending belief. There’s no real compulsion to gather ’round the tv these days. We’ve got blackberries, iphones, laptops, and: cable. Television is coming up on its emeritus days. And very few things are as synonymous with television as the Tonight Show. And to me, when the Tonight Show fell down — television fell down.

ZOË RICE: With Conan O’Brien’s move to TBS, the scales may be officially tipped. As far as relevance goes, network and cable late night programming had reached something of a balance: The Tonight Show and The Late Show dominated the network market, and The Daily Show and The Colbert Report owned the basic cable share. When everyone assumed Conan would go to Fox, a new wrench was expected to disrupt the network two-party system–how fun it would be to watch Conan battle it out with Jay and Dave within the old establishment. But now, with Conan jumping ship to basic cable, the battle he enters is much broader in scope. Instead of O’Brien vs. Leno vs. Letterman, it’s going to be senior citizen network television vs. young twenty-something cable. The very nature of relevant late-night programming may shift away from the struggling networks, extinguishing one of their last holds on wit and edge. In a couple years, network late night might simply be obsolete. Continue reading

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Leno/Conan: The Last Late Night War

EMILY SAIDEL: The Leno-Conan debacle presents a soap opera whose main plot is the failed experiment of short-term planning. David Carr at the New York Times intelligently questions the continued relevancy of this television format and the changing styles of television viewing. But the core of the issue was short-sighted vision, compounded with a lack of understanding of the changing television environment.

HOWARD MEGDAL: The fascinating part of the Leno/Conan debacle, for me, is less about the serious series of miscalculations made by NBC, and more how within a few years, few people will understand at all the resonance of “The Tonight Show” at all. Continue reading

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