Tag Archives: cable television

The Future of Netflix: Secure?

AKIE BERMISS: Netflix getting knocked off the throne of online streaming? I don’t think so. Take it from a guy who knows! I haven’t had a television for over a year. Any kind of home-viewing of movies or television shows is done from my computers. As such, I have Netflix *and* Amazon Prime. I rent movies from iTunes at least once a week. And recently, I’ve even begun thinking about getting a HULU+ membership. From all that, I can tell you one thing for certain: when it comes to streaming Netflix does it best, makes it the most available, and has the best potential for growth.

HOWARD MEGDAL But Blockbuster is precisely the comparison here. Netflix was first; that won’t give it a permanent stranglehold on the market. The question, at a certain point, will become: who do you trust to do it in a more customer-friendly way? The company that gave us the Quikster debacle? Or the company that has already laid waste to traditional publishing? Continue reading

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The Future of Radio

NAVA BRAHE: As an old college radio station alumna (Kingsborough Community College’s WKRB), I went through a period where I was deluded enough to think I could have a career in radio. That was during the mid-8os, just after MTV signed on, and “Video Killed the Radio Star”. I met a lot of great people, many of whom I’ve reconnected with thanks to social media, and I had a damn good time. Did I ever work a day in the business? No.

CHRIS PUMMER: Radio is dying because it sucks. Because the great local disc jockeys aren’t as local, which means they aren’t as great. Continue reading

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Rogers Communications and Toronto Sports

NAVA BRAHE: For those of you not familiar, Rogers Communications is Canada’s cable television, high speed Internet and mobile phone behemoth; and they own the Toronto Blue Jays. To add insult to injury, unlike the American cable and wireless behemoths, Toronto based Rogers has their tentacles in every province. That would be akin to Cablevision or Comcast on some serious steroids. Last week, they announced their intention to tender a $1.3 billion offer to The Ontario Teachers Pension Fund, the majority owners of the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Toronto Raptors, for their stake in Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment (MLSE). MLSE owns the Leafs, the Raptors and the AHL Toronto Marlies. If the bid is accepted, Rogers would own every Toronto sports team, with the exception of the CFL’s Toronto Argonauts. Rogers also owns SportsNet, the regional cable sports channels that, in Toronto, broadcast the majority of Leafs and Blue Jays games. And they also own SkyDome – to me it will always be SkyDome – but it was renamed “The Rogers Centre” a few years ago. Suffice it to say, when I got wind of this proposed buyout, my head almost exploded. Continue reading

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Keith Olbermann’s Suspension

ALLISON REILLY: With Olbermann returning to the Countdown on Tuesday, what was the point of his suspension? He was gone for two whole episodes, hardly anytime for any sort of “moral of the story.” Quite frankly, Olbermann’s suspension was just a slap on the wrist to exercise the facade of punishment, but not exercise any rule enforcement in particular.

JEREMY FUGLEBERG: MSNBC suspended Keith Olbermann last week, and frankly, he deserved it. To put it simply, he broke the rules. The host/anchor of his own show on the increasingly Left-ish cable channel donated some money to a number of Democrat candidates, some who appeared on his show in close proximity to his donations. Campaign donations are basically banned by NBC News, with which MSNBC is affiliated. Continue reading

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The State of TV

THOMAS DELAPA: Dazed and discontented viewers may well ask who took the “vision” out of television. It’s become our national id, where egos rule. But in an increasingly insular, home-theater society that wants its TV and MTV, nobody today is yelling “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going take this anymore.” Resistance seems programmed to fail. Like Chauncey Gardiner, the numbed voyeur of Being There, Americans like to watch.

NAVA BRAHE: Howard, I’ll give you The Daily Show, but I will not concede my belief that after The Sopranos finished, TV ended; at least for me.

JASON CLINKSCALES: I love television. I probably love it more because I’m the one who pays the cable bill, but I love it nonetheless. What I don’t love is how we talk about television. Continue reading

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Leno/Conan: The Last Late Night War

EMILY SAIDEL: The Leno-Conan debacle presents a soap opera whose main plot is the failed experiment of short-term planning. David Carr at the New York Times intelligently questions the continued relevancy of this television format and the changing styles of television viewing. But the core of the issue was short-sighted vision, compounded with a lack of understanding of the changing television environment.

HOWARD MEGDAL: The fascinating part of the Leno/Conan debacle, for me, is less about the serious series of miscalculations made by NBC, and more how within a few years, few people will understand at all the resonance of “The Tonight Show” at all. Continue reading

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